ARTIANA – Highlights – Lot 20 – Modern & Contemporary South Asian Art – Online Auction – No Buyer’s Premium – 24-28 September 2020

Sayed Haider Raza has stated, “sometime between 1975 and 1980, I began to feel the draw of my Indian heritage. I thought: I come from India, I have a different vision; I should incorporate what I have learned in France with Indian concepts. In this period, I visited India every year to study Indian philosophy, iconography, magic diagrams (yantras), an ancient Indian art, particularly Hindu, Buddhist, and Jain art. I was impressed by paintings from Basholi, Malwa, and Mewar, and began combining colors in a manner that echoed Indian miniature painting.” (Raza in conversation with Amrita Jhaveri, Sotheby’s Preview, March/April 2007, p.57).

Titled “Prakriti” or Nature, the painting reflects the artist’s lifelong commitment to depicting nature and its colors in his canvases. Evolving from his initial academic landscapes and abstracted expressionism on the same subject, Raza delved into the purest form of nature. Removing all inessential to attain the simplest interpretation. 

He singularly used colors that naturally exist in the visible world, the primary palette of red, blue, yellow, white, and black to represent the fundamental elements in creation – fire, water, earth, sky, and air. 
To underscore his non-representative vocabulary and maintain the geometric symbolism that he adopted later in his career, Raza deploys the inverted triangle – symbolic of female sexuality and reproduction with the bindu – symbolic of the seed that bears the potential of new life. Depicted together, they represent the tree of life and the perpetual cycle of nature, of fertilization, germination, growth, reproduction, and ultimately death.

Auction Catalogue – South Asian Art – ‘Modern and Contemporary’ – September 24 – 28, 2020

ARTIANA – Highlights – Lot 3 – Modern & Contemporary South Asian Art – Online Auction – No Buyer’s Premium – 24-28 September 2020

In the course of his lengthy career, Ram Kumar’s paintings gradually moved from figuration towards pure abstraction. His figurative landscapes came undone into swathes of colors, foregoing defined pictorial elements and slowly mutating to barely recognizable forms juxtaposed in an overlay of vertical and horizontal planes.

His unique visual vocabulary in painting landscapes was developed from treasured memory of scenery from his hometown and later his travels, as seen in the present work from the early 1980s. The works from these years are relatively flat in texture, with minimal build-up on the canvas. Although his landscapes were not realistic depictions of nature, “wedges of land and expanses of water; demarcations of land as arid and fertile; febrile rock and luxuriant vegetation; sunlight and shade; moisture; mist” are all communicated through his instinctive use of color. (R. Bartholomew, ‘The Abstract Principle in the Paintings of Ram Kumar’, Lalit Kala Contemporary 19 & 20, New Delhi, April – September 1975, p. 14.) Although his color palette ranging from browns, ochres, and yellows was limited during this time, “they derive their significance from their tonal subtleties, the tensions they create in passing from one tone to another.” (J. Swaminathan, ‘Ram Kumar – A New Stage’, Lalit Kala Contemporary 40, New Delhi, March 1995, p. 42.)

Auction Catalogue – South Asian Art – ‘Modern and Contemporary’ – September 24 – 28, 2020

ARTIANA – Highlights – Lot 6 – Modern & Contemporary South Asian Art – Online Auction – No Buyer’s Premium – 24-28 September 2020

The nude has been a recurring theme in Akbar Padamsee‘s work starting from the 1950s. The stylistic evolution from the sharply defined figures to the almost abstracted figures of his later compositions on the subject provides a fascinating insight into the development of his visual language and creative process of the prominent artist. 

Throughout his career, the artist has been enthralled with mapping the human form and capturing its emotive qualities using portraits and heads to experiment. His portraitures, however, are portrayed vaguely with a deep focus on the construction of the form rather than in the details of representation. In the picture, the central character is portrayed in a hazy dream-like scenario, almost as if the viewer is intruding into a private moment. The bold red color of the background juxtaposed with the nude sets the emotive tone in the image while the ingenious use of texture gives the body sculptural presence and dimensionality. 

Clearly, Padamsee’s artistic concerns do not lie in the realist depiction but instead on the overall structure of the picture. Curiously, despite the detached treatment of the theme, Padamsee was able to maintain a sense of sensitivity to the lived experience of his subjects. 

‘Sensitivity to the human presence has been Akbar Padamsee’s obsession, inspiration, and purpose of his art. Direct in a nearly-tactile way, but also sublimated and universalized, his heads and nudes initially exude a feeling of almost real persons. Gradually, however, they reveal themselves as distanced and generalized. Sometimes strong, even harsh in their impact, and sometimes indistinct and ethereal. Padamsee’s images are never portraits of identifiable people. In fact, they resemble a residual vision after an encounter. An aura is left by a presence transposed in the memory. They come through like quick notations of transitory meetings, the heads and bodies deeply attuned to what is experienced within them, while also absorbing the proximity of their surroundings, especially other human presences. The background becomes a part of the human situation imprinting it character and compulsions on people, and in turn, being influenced by them – the process both violent and soothing.’ (Marta Jakimowicz, Tracing Shadows of the Sublime, Akbar Padamsee Works on Paper – Critical Boundaries, Pundole Art Gallery, Mumbai, 2004).

Auction Catalogue – South Asian Art – ‘Modern and Contemporary’ – September 24 – 28, 2020

ARTIANA – Highlights – Lot 30 – Modern & Contemporary South Asian Art – Online Auction – No Buyer’s Premium – 24-28 September 2020

Lot 30 – M.F. Husain – Afternoon After The Kill – 1989 – acrylic on canvas – 40 x 60 in. (101.6 x 152.4 cm.)

Much like his predecessors and peers, M.F. Husain was drawn to the subject of India’s colonial past. He started working on a series of Raj theme paintings that embody his take on this period of Indian history by the 1980s. Dubbed originally as the ‘Images of the Raj’ when the artist first started producing them, their themes and motifs would subsequently spill over to Husain’s succeeding series until the later part of his life. But compared to other artist’s serious treatment of the subject, Husain’s Raj bordered on the satirical, combining elements of history and witty commentary on the effects of Raj on society and oftentimes juxtaposing contrasting subjects in the painting to illustrated the opposing dynamics present, ‘each subtly absorbing the identity of the other and each equally subtly resisting that absorption.’ (D. Herwitz, Husain, 1988, p. 19.)

Arguably one of Husain’s more popular series, the period of British colonial rule or most commonly referred to as the Raj, resulted in some of the sharpest, perceptive, and also most spirited, of works that he produced throughout his prolific career. “These works are densely packed with objects and people (British and native, high and low, male and female) and some animals as well, brought together in narrative action enormously revealing of the anxieties of imperial rule in India, even as their absurdities elicit a chuckle or smile from the viewer.” (Sumathi Ramaswamy, Husain’s Raj, The Marg Foundation, June 2016, pg. 12) 

Titled ‘Afternoon Tea after the Kill,’ Husain depicts two of the most British tradition during the era, tea time and tiger hunting. With the sport referred to as ‘colonial hunt.’ The picture alludes to the defeat of the tiger, the conquest of India, and the eventual lengthy crown rule that follows. But aside from the obvious interpretation, the fallen animal was depicted resembling ‘Tipu’s Tiger,’ a mechanical tiger savaging a British soldier commissioned for Tipu Sultan, ruler of Mysore, and one of the fiercest and implacable enemies of the British. He was, however, defeated and killed in 1799. While the ‘colonial hunt’ represented domination of nature and natives, it also became the point of contention within the elite due to the perceived connection between hunting, power, and privilege, as hunting came to be regulated by laws by the 1900s.

Like his other paintings, his figures are intentionally obscure with vague references to historical figures that are often intentionally fictionalized. Here, the featureless Western lady wears a sleeveless dress with a sunhat, her companion is draped in his hunting garb while his counterpart is dressed in the majestic garb of a Maharaja. The tiger is placed most prominently in the center, reminiscent of photographs of British royalty photographed aside dead tiger carcasses from the same period. The Shikars, the traditional Indian hunters turned guide, is seen atop the elephant almost blending with the background. 

Husain’s recall of the Raj is intensely personal but also fiercely political, a painter for the people, he immortalized each period of Indian history in his canvases, celebrating and informing his audience of the amalgamation of periods that gave rise to the composite culture of the present. By choosing to cast his eyes back to this particular period, he produced powerful works charge with nationalism and humor that are global in its form yet deeply Indian in its content.

Auction Catalogue – South Asian Art – ‘Modern and Contemporary’ – September 24 – 28, 2020

Artiana to host their flagship South Asian Art Auction from 24-28 September 2020

20 September 2020, Dubai – Following the continued success of all their auctions this year including their last South Asian art auction held in March, Artiana is pleased to present their current catalogue of modern and contemporary artworks from the Indian subcontinent. Paintings and sculptures by South Asia’s leading artists will be available for online bidding from 24 to 28 September 2020 on their website www.artiana.com. 

Lavesh Jagasia, Managing Director of Artiana, in front of M.F. Husain’s Afternoon Tea After The Kill (1989) – the cover lot of their upcoming South Asian Art sale.

Collectors, seasoned and new, can acquire works by artists from the Progressive Artists Group such as Maqbool Fida Husain, Sayed Haider Raza, Akbar Padamsee, Francis Newton Souza, and Ram Kumar. The sale also features works by established modernists and contemporary artists Sakti Burman, Himmat Shah, Jogen Chowdhury, Zarina Hashmi, Jamil Naqsh alongside Neo-tantric art vanguards G.R. Santosh and Sohan Qadri. 

Leading the collection is M.F. Husain’s seminal new to market work  “Afternoon Tea After The Kill” painted in 1989 depicting the artist’s insightful and spirited take on the British colonial period in India and Untitled (Laxmi) depicting the Hindu goddess with a white elephant alluding abundance and auspiciousness painted in 1998. Another untitled work from the artist featuring two horses with an elephant is also part of the suite, all with impeccable provenance. 

Also part of the sale is an important work by Ganesh Pyne’s from 1982 titled, “Vulture” showcasing the artist’s brand of poetic surrealism. Other highlights include signature works by S.H. Raza including “Rajasthan”(1998) and “Prakriti”(2006); Jamil Naqsh’s “Untitled-Lady with a Pigeon”(2006); F.N. Souza’s “Untitled-Nude”(1965) and “Head”(1963); and one from Krishen Khanna’s Bandwallas series. Two introspective paintings painted in 1992 and a bronze sculpture by Akbar Padamsee will also go under the hammer.  

Interested buyers can bid online at www.artiana.com or through the ARTIANA mobile app, from September 24 (6:00 pm) to September 28 (9:00 pm) UAE time with a No Buyer’s Premium policy: ‘What You Bid Is What You Pay’. Artiana’s FlexiPay, which allows buyers to ‘Bid Now Pay Later,’ will also be available for clients subject to eligibility. (FlexiPay scheme details are available on their website.) 

The sale catalogue can be browsed online while a viewing appointment can be arranged from September 12-24, 2020, from 11 am to 6 pm at Artiana’s art gallery located in Metropolis Tower in Downtown Dubai. For further information on how to register and bid, visit their website at www.artiana.com. For quick assistance and inquiries, call Artiana’s Help Desk at +971 55 815 3030 or write to info@artiana.com. 

Auction Catalogue – South Asian Art – ‘Modern and Contemporary’ – September 24 – 28, 2020

ARTIANA announces Online Auction of Modern and Contemporary South Asian Art – No Buyer’s Premium – 24-28 September 2020

Browse the sale at www.artiana.com

Our upcoming auction presents works by leading modernists and contemporary artists from South Asia such as M. F. Husain, F. N. Souza, Ram Kumar from The Progressive Artists’ Group alongside Jogen Chowdhury, Sohan Qadri, Ganesh Pyne, Zarina Hashmi, and G.R. Santosh. The sale has signature subject works of Akbar Padamsee, Jamil Naqsh, and S.H. Raza, as well as a suite of watercolor works by Sakti Burman. Two sculptures by Himmat Shah and one by Akbar Padamsee are also part of this sale catalogue.

Auction Catalogue – South Asian Art – ‘Modern and Contemporary’ – September 24 – 28, 2020

A Feast for the Senses: The Art of Senaka Senanayake

Featured originally on barnebys.co.uk, June 23, 2020

Senaka Senenayake (1951- ), Winged Wonders (detail), 2019, oil on canvas, 91.4 x 121.9 cm. Image via ARTIANA

Lush rainforests populated with tropical birds, colourful butterflies and Hindu and Buddhist deities tantalise the viewer in Senaka Senanayake’s latest exhibition and sale, ‘The Enchanted Forest’. 

Hosted by Artiana in Dubai, the online exhibition Senaka Senanayake: The Enchanted Forest marks Artiana’s inaugural sale with the beloved artist and features some of Senanayake’s most recent paintings. The sale runs for the month of June, and pieces include bold botanic imagery, fields of eye-catching butterflies, and clusters of cheery macaws. Senanayake captures the beauty of the tropical rainforest on his canvases, allowing viewers to bring a piece of nature into their own homes. 

Born in Sri Lanka in 1951, Senaka Senenayake quickly became known as a child prodigy for his artistic prowess and had his first international one-man show in New York at the age of the ten. He later studied at Yale, gaining his degree in Art and Architecture before moving back to Sri Lanka. Currently residing in Colombo, he continues to use the flora and fauna of his home country as inspiration for his work, fostering appreciation for his surroundings and making him one of the best-known artists of the region.  

Environmentalism plays a huge part in Senenayake’s work, and his love and respect for nature shines through his paintings. The Sri Lankan rainforests are threatened by intense deforestation, and industries like tea production are particularly destructive in their pursuit of farmable land for plantations. Native animals disappear as their habitats are destroyed, and entire ecosystems are in danger of collapse.

Senanayake utilises painting as a form of advocacy, depicting the beauty of these threatened landscapes and creating an awareness of their precarious situation. He searches for harmony between people and the earth, encouraging viewers to connect to and coexist with the natural environments around them. The diversity and colour in Senanayake’s paintings speak to the vibrancy of the forests, and remind us of how precious they truly are.

However, Senanayake focuses on the current vitality of the rainforests rather than contemplating their destruction. In paintings like Winged Wonders, the canvas comes alive with butterflies flitting around a variety of flowers. He captures the multitudes of species around him in a few bold brushstrokes and celebrates the bright and colourful life of the ‘Enchanted Forest.’

Religious imagery also appears frequently in Senanayake’s works, such as depictions of Ganesha, the elephant-headed deity known as the patron of the arts, remover of obstacles and the deva of wisdom. Transparent bubbles appear around animals to represent the eternal circle of life as conceived by Buddhists, while the lotus flower signifies enlightenment and rebirth.

Spirituality and nature exist side by side in Senenayake’s idyllic scenes, depicting the splendor of the outdoors while reminding us that humans are just one part of a larger ecosystem. It is easy to get lost in his paintings, appreciating the colour and masterful brushwork while feeling the very same joy and serenity that one experiences while in nature.

Artiana’s sale ends 30 June at 9pm UAE time, with all bidding occurring virtually. The full catalogue is available online to browse, and prior registration is required to place a bid. 

Senaka Senanayake: The Enchanted Forest | Selling Exhibition | 1 – 30 June 2020

‘Senaka Senanayake: The Enchanted Forest’ is an online selling exhibition featuring recent works of the artist based on his signature subjects of tropical rainforests, vivid butterflies, colorful macaws, and majestic paintings of mythological Hindu deities Ganesha and Krishna. Each work from this exhibition is a celebration of his native country’s flora and fauna, showing his fervent passion for nature’s beauty and great appreciation for the vibrancy and diversity of the forests that stir his imagination and inspire his works.

Senaka Senanayake – Butterfly Garden (2018)30 x 72 in. (76.2 x 182.9 cm.) – oil on canvas

For years, he has concentrated his art as a medium of advocacy by depicting beautiful scenes from the rainforest to promote public awareness of environmental degradation, expressing deep concern over the loss of nature to the hands of man. His relentless search for peace and coexistence with nature by fusing the modernity of European art forms to the more traditional Sinhala lends his paintings a uniqueness that is truly his own.

Senaka Senanayake – Mayur Ganesha in The Enchanted Forest (2018) – oil on canvas – 48 x 48 in. (121.9 x 121.9 cm.)

In selecting themes and figurations which have a deep religious connotation; like the ubiquitous transparent bubbles which signify the eternal cycle of life in the Buddhist faith, the lotus, and the portrayal of Hindu Gods, Senaka introduces a sense of spirituality through his art ushering the viewer into the junction where spirituality and nature meet.

Through this series of works portraying virgin habitats of butterflies, birds, colorful ferns, and flowers that make a riot of color and illuminates the idyllic setting of ‘The Enchanted Forest,’ Senaka brings to his audience the lushness and splendor of nature while also delivering feelings of joy, healing, and serenity one gets from spending time with it.

Exhibition Catalogue – Senaka Senanayake: The Enchanted Forest – An Online Selling Exhibition – June 1-30, 2020

ELLINGTON ART GALLERY AT DT1 IN DOWNTOWN DUBAI ADDS TO THE CULTURAL SHOWCASE OF THE CITY

Original article posted May 21, 2020 at ellingtonproperties.ae

“It’s a pleasure to collaborate with Ellington Properties on this initiative as we aim to continue raising levels of appreciation for art across the region. The Ellington Art Gallery will serve as a perfect springboard from which we will showcase established as well as emerging artists. […]”

Lavesh Jagasia, Managing Director, Artiana

First dedicated art gallery by Ellington Properties developed in partnership with art auction house Artiana.

Ellington Properties, Dubai’s leading design-led property developer, has announced its first dedicated art gallery that will add to the cultural showcase of the city, a vibrant global hub for arts and culture. Celebrating the design-led ethos of the developer, Ellington Properties will soon open doors to Ellington Art Gallery, located in its DT1 residential tower in Downtown Dubai, which will be completed shortly.

Taking pride of place on the ground floor, the gallery is developed in collaboration with leading art auction house, Artiana, and will feature specially curated, contemporary art exhibitions. In addition to adding aesthetic and inspirational value to the residents of DT1, the Ellington Art Gallery will provide art lovers and visitors compelling cultural experiences through the various exhibits.

Robert Booth, Managing Director, Ellington Properties, said: “Art and design are fundamental elements in the creation of appealing, contemporary developments that people want to live in. With this in mind, we chose to launch the first Ellington Art Gallery at DT1, our first development in Downtown Dubai. Led by its central location, elegant architecture and world-class design, DT1 will be a sought-after location for those who aspire to be at the heart of Dubai’s vibrant lifestyle destination with the gallery creating an added referral point for their refined lifestyle.”

Lavesh Jagasia, Managing Director, Artiana, added: “It’s a pleasure to collaborate with Ellington Properties on this initiative as we aim to continue raising levels of appreciation for art across the region. The Ellington Art Gallery will serve as a perfect springboard from which we will showcase established as well as emerging artists. The curatorial programme will focus on exhibitions that will add to the multicultural art landscape of Dubai while enhancing the experience of residents in contemporary communities such as DT1 in Downtown Dubai. We are inclined to support Ellington’s commitment to art and look forward to a long and fruitful collaboration as we support them in the delivery of exceptional, liveable communities for modern living.”

The spacious Ellington Art Gallery will host the works of artists from around the world, with the aim to broaden the understanding and appreciation of art in Dubai and the region. In addition to curated selling exhibitions, the gallery will offer a range of services including acquisitions, collection management, curatorial services, and advisory along with private sales and bespoke art storage solutions for collectors.

The launch of Ellington Art Gallery further underlines the company’s wider support of the artistic community, creating opportunities for them to showcase their work. Recently, Ellington Properties partnered with the College of Architecture, Art and Design (CAAD) at American University of Sharjah (AUS) for the central art piece Hamama in Belgravia II which won The Collaboration award at the Bazaar Interiors Awards 2020.

Just walking distance from the iconic Burj Khalifa, Dubai Opera and The Dubai Mall, DT1 is set in an area of about 20,000 square meters and rises to a majestic height of 76 meters. The property has won several awards including ‘Best Residential High-Rise’ at the Middle East Architect Awards 2019 and ‘Best Architecture – Multiple Residence’ at the Arabian Property Awards 2019.